Employee of the Month

A photo diary set in my workplace bathroom, which has great lighting. The photos were taken from Spring 2017 through Winter 2018. For Hyperplum's Winter term show in the LaVerne Krause Gallery, titled Supermarket.

Employee of the Month follows one of the most tumultuous and exciting years of my young life in no particular order. It both catalogues the monotony of the 9 to 5 lifestyle, and celebrates the joy of escaping to a large, sunny bathroom at the end of a hallway. 

Here, boy!

For Hyperplum's Spring term show in the LaVerne Krause Gallery. Swerve, curated by Lucy Miller, meant to help the artists diverge from their natural path. This piece, Here, boy! sought to create narrative and dialogue about identity in a situation which lacked a narrative subject. 

Here, boy! recalls the childish gimmick of the invisible dog toy, where one could feign ownership of a non-existent canine friend. This piece draws on themes of spectacle, ownership, the forced performance of people of color in public spaces. It objectifies and defines the non-existent dog through its drab surroundings in the kennel, and yet still manages to preserve its dignity through its unique and exotic name and collar. It implies a dark and forced subordination, yet maintains a playful and comical air. 

The Fifth Day of May

The Fifth Day of May is a series of illustrations which follow the narrative of the song "ISIS" by Bob Dylan. Under the instruction of Signe Parkins at the Animation Workshop in Viborg, Denmark, I edited the story by cutting and pasting words from Alice in Wonderland and created compositions by working with collage, and painted the final versions with watercolor and ink.

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Year of the Samsung Galaxy S8

The Year of the Samsung Galaxy S8 was created for Ty Warren's Digital Drawing Class at the University of Oregon in the Fall of 2016. A reference to the book Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace, the short 6-page comic explores ideas such as social media, consumerism, the millennial generation and youth involvement with world politics. It was inspired by Infinite Jest and a conversation  about Donald Trump in the wake of the 2016 election.

It has been printed as a zine, hand stapled and distributed over the last year on campus and around Eugene. Translation by Camilla Markussen (Find her work here.) 

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3 PACK COMICS

3 Packs of mini comics made for Euzine Fest. Each pack contains 3 original mini-comics! Available soon online. If you are interested in purchasing them ASAP, please contact me through the about section.

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PACK #1

1. People Ask Me "Why Do You Like Dogs?"

2. On the Plane Home from St. Paul

3. I Miss the Harris Alley House

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PACK #2

1. Even Today

2. My First House

3. I Think I Know Who I Am

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Please Welcome... All-American

My piece for Hyperplum's first show THIS IS US.

People of color always exist in a performative space, either being forced to assume specific mannerisms or change our appearances to reinforce, circumvent, or completely break through stereotypes and expectations surrounding our race. However, in spaces designated for performance, the performer is always under the scrutiny of the audience, making the job of the musician/artist/poet two-fold. They must not only 1) curate their body of work to be relatable content, but must also 2) curate their own image to make that content relatable and easily accessible to the audience. For musicians of color in the indie/rock music scene, (a genre dominated traditionally by white people), navigating these requirements can mean attempting to completely strip certain aspects of POC identity from their work.   

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For POC, fitting into white spaces on a day-to-day basis is difficult enough. Our inability to control our perceived image in totality often means auditing our behavior to fit in. The pageantry and exploitation of POC in performance spaces is nothing new, and similarly, the entertainment value of musically-inclined animals has been exploited in culture since the day we taught a monkey to clap a cymbal. 

 

A Lonely Road: June and Eli

A Lonely Road: June and Eli (2016) was an experiment in narrative storytelling and Riso Printing. An 8 page comic printed in pink and cornflower blue, it follows June and Eli and their unsuccessful recovery of unnamed documents from an abandoned lab.

With the help of my instructor Isami Ching and the A&AA's sketchy old Riso, I printed 25 copies of A Lonely Road to distribute to my classmates.

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